Saturday, June 2, 2018

Why I am a Genre-Jumper

           


                    Publishers tell authors that the best way to cultivate a following, as an author, is to write in one genre. One releases a book, markets it, and ideally, each time one releases a book you have purchasers who buy your book because they were already hooked on your prior published efforts. This is the way, they say, to cultivate a following. This has certainly worked for Patsy Cornwell, John Grisham,  Stephen King and Dean Koontz.  (Yes, Hi, you'all, I am quoting you.)

                   Why then, am I a Genre-Jumper?  (Yes, my word, no one elses)
I have often said that I write what I see needs to be written. Then it is to be released into the world to be read and to help others, as it will be there far longer than I.  My first book was actually Rational Preparedness:A Primer to Preparedness.  It was written because families needed a book that would allow them to prepare for different types of emergencies written in a concise and clear manner, so that they could make reasonable disaster preparations in the space of one short weekend.

My second book is the story of the life and times and the loss of my beloved son Daniel. What I Learned from Daniel, is not only the sharing of a remarkable young man who was sent to our family, but contains wisdom on surviving grief and loss as a family, and finding comfort and even contentment afterward.

                 I might have stopped there had there not been a request or series of them for a novel with a preparedness but not a post-apocalyptic theme. My first novel,  Portsoy Woods, tells of a family who relocates from the suburbs to an extremely rural environment just prior to an American financial collapse.

   In November of last year, I found myself writing a very difficult piece, entitled, Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey: The Life of the Explorer.   Explorer Kelsey was not only a sixteen year old radio operator during WWII who was in Okinawa on a ship when the bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but not much time later, he was in Bari, Italy, just after the Luftwaffe bombed every ship in the harbor. Subsequent years found him as the young radio operator on the Finn Ronne Antarctic Expedition, and later in Afghanistan and Pakistan on the Fairservis Archaeological Expedition. His many exploits continue throughout his lifetime. He was a very interesting father to have had.

                 My fifth book is in the works. It's a novel that lays bare both loss and romantic love, another departure in writing for me.

                   I genre jump because I want to relate all that I see or have experienced in life, in novel form or otherwise.  Don't you think reading just one genre would be boring?     That's what I thought!





Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Sometimes, There's Recognition

            

 

  Writing isn't always a thankless job. Occasionally I cash a royalty check and have a shopping spree the the Dollar Store. If you don't go there often, then it's astounding as to how much you can really spend there.
             
                This week writing brought a pleasant surprise.   Rational Preparedness: The Blog, an effort of mine which is ten years old and was a project in tandem with my podcast of the same name, and with my book Rational Preparedness:A Primer to Preparedness, received an important accolade.
The Blog was selected as "One of the 74 Best Blogs for Survival and Preparedness for 2018".
             
                 Thank you to everyone who reads this blog and who comments.

https://www.jaysguide.com/best-survival-blogs/#wwwrationalpreparednessblogspotcom




Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Things Jane Doesn't Like About Being an Author

              

The world is a massive blank slate of much to write about. Why steal my ideas or concepts ?



          I belong to a number of  author groups although I don't spend much time there.  Many of the authors there complain about aspects of the process of writing, or the solitude, or revisions etc.  I have concluded that I am not like most authors because none of those things really bother me. The process of writing to me, is a dream job.  Most of the time I outline the project. I get up at three or four am to get about four hours of writing done before the rest of the day begins. Most of my projects aren't really free form. I follow my own outline and within a chapter, I have specific objectives I need to meet before that chapter is linked up to the next.  No one likes revisions, but when revisions went from the typewriter to the computer, then it became a much less labor intensive task. I also don't mind the solitude. If I get four hours of writing done after four am, and before I tackle caring for the horses each morning, then I can leisurely put in another couple or several hours later in the day, and if I want, I can see or talk to other people.

                 There are some aspects of modern day writing that I don't care for, in fact, they irk me very much.   It bothers me that my work or comments I might make in articles or books are copied and enlarged upon. I know that imitation can be a sincere form of flattery, but it annoys me anyway.   It also bothers me that intellectual property laws are weak internationally and that a crook in another country can sell a copy of my book in a manner in which I will never be paid.  Lastly, it irks me that a person I haven't heard from in years can read one of my books, figure out who I once was, and then contact me as if we are the best of friends.  If you moved on, and don't know me now, then you chose it, and let it be.

                 I suppose that everyone has pet peeves about whatever they do, and that writers should be no exception.   It does make it hard sometimes to be positive about writing a new book when the last one sold copies for which I will never be paid.





Sunday, December 17, 2017

Electronic Versions of Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey:The Life of the Explorer Now Available



    Effective November 30, 2017, my latest book, the above, was released.    This is the first link I have found where it is for sale:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1634927850/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1512141728&sr=1-4

     My father was an original prepper and an original survivor in a number of harsh and foreign lands. He is no doubt where a lot of my interest and mindset in preparedness is derived.

   
     Thank you for your interest and a special thanks goes out to those who contributed or aided me in some way in this most difficult of my books.

  These are the links for electronic versions of this book:

Amazon Store URL - https://kdp.amazon.com/…/dualbookshelf.marketpla…/B0782819RV

BN Store URL - https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lawrence-dewol…/1127574533…

   

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Coming Soon: A Fourth Book

         
Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey, taken just before the Finn Ronne Antarctic Expedition of the 1940s.



            Shortly, I hope that my fourth book will be available for sale and distribution, probably sometime in late November, 2017.



               This next book is the biography of the explorer, Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey, who was a WWII ship's radio officer, at first in the Merchant Marine. Next, he became the radio officer on the Finn Ronne Antarctic Expedition of the late nineteen-forties. Afterward, he held assignments in the North Pole and then on to Afghanistan.  The book is not only a story of the occupational life of this man, from a fascinating era, but is also a story of his challenges, sorrows and triumphs. Lawrence Kelsey is also my father.

               I hope that you are able to make time to read what has been my most challenging book to write thus far.  Thank you for your support and encouragement with regard to this project..



  It will be entitled, Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey: The Life of the Explorer





Thursday, October 5, 2017

Embroiled in a Writing Marathon


                   I apologize for my minimal presence on the blogs.  I have been writing my fourth book which is a true story of the life of a modern day explorer. It has been very challenging, in part, because it has required so many interviews of people who were involved in an expedition or a project of some kind.  I have reached 102,000 words thus far. The project is not yet finished, and then the process of revisions must take place before it goes on to editing.   Thank you for checking back.  Have a lovely autumn.